Culture

Spain Literature Part III

Overall, the second half of the 1970s saw a vigorous and booming narrative flourish. Previous trends have matured: the novelists of the previous generation now offer a mature work, while the younger ones, who had made their first tests at the turn of the two decades, find inspiration and tools for writing novels in the climate of freedom., even without expressing a generational rejection, they represent a peculiar problematic dimension, more characterized by the new situation and the new conditions in which they appear. In short, there was no break, but the progressive enrichment of a narrative method open to evolution. In the second half of the decade, the literary landscape is affected by a peculiar and significant phenomenon: many young storytellers enter the scene, as never seen in the past. The female presence emerges not as a group or tendency, but as defined individualities, which flank, with specific writing and problems, the few and still active writers of previous decades (R. Chacel; C. Martín Gaite, n.1925). The young storytellers publish novels inspired by women, but also feminists, which could never have come out just a few years earlier. In general, these are family and social stories, in which morbid atmospheres predominate, steeped in eroticism (up to lesbian eroticism) and man-woman relationships in which the psychological, educational and historical tensions of the Spanish bourgeoisie explode. Among the most significant titles they should at least be reported, the young storytellers publish novels inspired by women, but also feminists, which could never have come out just a few years earlier. In general, these are family and social stories, in which morbid atmospheres predominate, steeped in eroticism (up to lesbian eroticism) and man-woman relationships in which the psychological, educational and historical tensions of the Spanish bourgeoisie explode. Among the most significant titles they should at least be reported El mismo mar de todos los verano (1978) and El amor es un juego solitario (1979) by E. Tusquets (b. 1936); Tiempo de cerezas (1977) by M. Roig (1946-1991); Burdeos (1980) by Spain Puértola Villanueva (b. 1947); Te trataré como una reína (1979) by R. Montero (b. 1951).

At the beginning of the Eighties, after the chaotic and tense phase of the immediate post-Francoism, along with political stability, the Spain experienced an accelerated economic development and consequent well-being. In a few years the whole town changed its face, manifesting an intense and articulated cultural vitality. Even the literary panorama undergoes gradual significant changes: the experimental novel inexorably declines, especially in its most exasperated and aggressive forms; and after some initial difficulties, the writers of the seventies set out in the direction of a more traditional, good quality fiction, writing works in which interest in the story told, in the analysis of the story and in the coherent thematic development is reborn..

But the real turning point is not given by the return to the classic and traditional novel of well-known and established authors, but by the appearance of a new generation of young writers, who present marked cultural, expressive and thematic peculiarities, and which constitute the most relevant novelty of the the eighties. These are the so-called ” new narrators ”, individualistic, free and cosmopolitan who, programmatically, intend to turn their backs on the Spanish literary tradition, breaking polemically with the themes, problems and forms that fed the work of previous generations. They seek inspiration, influences and models outside their country, without being blocked by borders and traditions and without any need to represent typically Spanish realities and problems. Thus they produce a narrative in which urban themes predominate (the life of the big cities, its signs, symbols, languages, the middle classes, man-woman relationships, sex, drugs, music); in short, every space in which masses of men and women flock becomes the setting for their stories, as an expression of a general condition of the times rather than as a specific issue of a country. Furthermore, the treatment of these themes does not start from any attempt to denounce or reflect, but from a sort of pessimistic and fatalistic acceptance of a factual reality, represented with ironic, skeptical and often humorous veins.

According to healthvv, the foreign literary tradition appears to these young writers as an object of personal and subjective recreation: from this derives the presence in their works of a variety of styles, trends, genres that coexist with apparent great ease. They dedicate themselves with passion and enthusiasm to composing well-constructed novels, working on the narrative structures and laws of the genre. It is a generation of writers who have decided to get out of literary autarchy, preferring to move away from themselves and their environment to the point of making what is ” foreign ” a peculiar problematic feature, a foundation of style and a distinctive sign. His literary cosmopolitanism is the fruit not of some international mentality.

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