Business

Netherlands Economic Overview

The Netherlands represent an extraordinary example of how a country with scarcely natural resources and in perennial struggle to safeguard the territory from the assaults of the sea, manages to achieve some of the most advanced economic and social levels in the world thanks above all to the constant efforts of a community. efficient and well organized. Historically, the foundations of Dutch prosperity rest on specialized and intensive agriculture and even more on commercial activity which, taking advantage of the advantages of the geographical position favorable to trade, the development of transport and international relations (among other things, the Netherlands are the natural outlet for German products), has gradually become a powerful source of wealth: For some time now the Dutch have enjoyed a very solid reputation as expert farmers, skilled merchants and commercial intermediaries, great bankers and financiers. But to ensure the strengthening of traditional agricultural and commercial activities, it was necessary on the one hand to gain more and more land to the sea, making use of highly technological reclamation processes, and on the other to equip the river ports with new and easier access channels to the sea., especially at the mouth of the Rhine, a fundamental presence for the Dutch economy. However, starting from the second post-war period, the country witnessed a significant transformation of its production structures: in order to cope with the demographic expansion and be able to maintain the high standard of living, it became essential to strengthen the hitherto rather weak industrial apparatus (the manufacturing activities of the past, although various, had on the whole a fairly limited consistency), so as to ensure a rational balance between a modern agriculture, but which increasingly denounced a serious surplus of manpower, and an overly developed tertiary sector.

According to Cheeroutdoor, the industrialization process was rather rapid, favored by appropriate State interventions (for example, the control over urban developments and territorial management in general has been decisive and still is) in the context of an economic structure with an modern agriculture, but which increasingly denounced a serious surplus of manpower, and an excessively developed tertiary sector. The industrialization process was rather rapid, favored by appropriate State interventions (for example, the control over urban developments and territorial management in general has been decisive and still is) in the context of an economic structure with an modern agriculture, but which increasingly denounced a serious surplus of manpower, and an excessively developed tertiary sector. The industrialization process was rather rapid, favored by appropriate State interventions (for example, the control over urban developments and territorial management in general has been decisive and still is) in the context of an economic structure with an liberalism, open both to private initiative and to the main government addresses. Industrialization has also caused new orientations in national economic policy: the need to find adequate commercial outlets for Dutch products has in fact promoted a considerable effort to integrate into the urban fabric.

A production structure such as the Dutch one, obligatorily anchored to the international economic framework, to the trend of foreign markets (exports are equal to one third of the national product) and to the fluctuations in the prices of imported raw materials, on whose transformation mostly Dutch industries live, it could not help being affected, at the beginning of the Eighties of the twentieth century, by the very serious world economic crisis. Effectively, one of the main causes of the economic deterioration recorded by the Netherlands was the decline in the competitiveness of industry: a country that traditionally thrives on the prosperity of its trade has suffered with particular immediacy from the internal difficulties of the industrial world combined with the slowdown in trade and the global recession. Overall, however, the Netherlands stood out, together with Germany, among the countries that best coped with the heavily negative world economic situation: in particular, the financial system kept its efficiency. Having gone through a period of restructuring, tending to raise its technological level, the industry, relying mainly on large multinationals based in the country, it substantially managed to regain the positions previously acquired, at the cost of recourse to numerous layoffs and a significant responsibility in increasing the level of unemployment. With respect to the safeguarding of employment levels, greater interest and more remarkable results resulted in the control of inflation, which was kept at minimum levels.

In general, there has been a progressive attenuation of the social protection measures (in any case still quite high), as well as of certain structures of a With respect to the safeguarding of employment levels, greater interest and more remarkable results resulted in the control of inflation, which was kept at minimum levels. In general, there has been a progressive attenuation of the social protection measures (in any case still quite high), as well as of certain structures of a With respect to the safeguarding of employment levels, greater interest and more remarkable results resulted in the control of inflation, which was kept at minimum levels. In general, there has been a progressive attenuation of the social protection measures (in any case still quite high), as well as of certain structures of a Welfare State among the most advanced and efficient, through measures to reduce public spending. The strong outsourcing of the economy, which has already manifested itself to an extent equal to that of the most developed realities, has been encouraged in recent years by the medium-term orientations of state economic policy, which aims to consolidate the country’s role as a commercial and international financial. In 2003, after several years of high economic times, the Dutch economy went through a period of contraction, affected by the events that took place on the international scene. But in the first months of 2004 there were gradual signs of recovery (in 2008 the annual per capita income was US $ 52,019, the national one US $ 868,940) although with a rather modest growth rate (around 1%) and a public deficit (3.2 – 3.5%) that exceeds the parameters of the stability pact EU. In 2018, gross income per capita was $ 57,380 internationally, GDP was US $ 912,899m and GDP per capita was US $ 53,106.

Netherlands Economic Overview